Tag Archives: financial translator

Why am I a financial translator?

Why am I a financial translator?

By Francesca Airaghi

Boring? It is not!

I might have done something else in my life. However, I have always wished to become a translator.
I could translate tourist guides, I love travelling! Possibly cookbooks, I like cooking!

Why am I a financial translator? In the beginnings, it was by chance. I started working in-house at a translation company specialising in finance and law. My educational background was foreign languages and literature. Over the years, I attended numerous courses on economics and the capital markets and worked side by side with experts. I have been a financial translator for more than 20 years now, and if you ask me why I am a financial translator, the answer is that I like it. I love my job.

Financial translation may be challenging though rewarding. People think it is boring or too complex and overlook a specialisation that can be profitable, a constantly growing sector. Volumes are increasing (there is a recent Deloitte study confirming it), and the financial translation sector is very wide, spanning from accounting such as annual reports, financial statements, to investment funds and asset management, banking, international trade, or corporate communication. A translator might know a lot about accounting but almost nothing about financial markets or asset management, or might not have the writing skills to translate corporate communication. You can choose to specialise in a niche. As a financial translator, I work with global companies, leading banks, worldwide asset managers. They are usually good paying clients.



Why would I recommend to other translators to specialise in finance? If you like being a translator, you certainly like continuous learning. Financial translators must keep up to date with current affairs, financial news, global events. It may be time consuming sometimes, though it is interesting and rewarding. Financial translation involves technical terminology and the knowledge of a special language, which is at the same time informative and emotional. First of all, financial translators need to understand the subject matter very well in order to translate appropriately.

Unfortunately, based on my experience as proofreader and recruiter, there are not so many professional financial translators. There is a lack of training courses in the field of financial translation that teach you the most common traps and give you the basics to understand finance and economics, how to find the resources and develop the appropriate communication skills. I constantly receive mentoring requests from my students and when I go to translation conferences, financial translators are always in very small number. My host Marcel Solé is a passionate trainer of financial translation from English into Spanish, and I am happy we had chance to meet and exchange ideas on the financial translation industry and specifically on teaching financial translation.

In October and November, I will conduct a 5 webinar series on financial translation on Prozcom, preceded by an introductory session on “How to become a successful financial translator”. The webinars will be conducted in Italian and will focus on English and Italian financial terminology. You can learn to be more confident in translating financial statements, economic news, and investment funds. To become a good financial translator, you need to understand. Starting from basic concepts (the Stock Exchange, return, inflation, the banking system), I will go through real-life examples of economic and financial language and frequent documents. You can learn the most common terminology in English and Italian and how to avoid the main tricks and traps for a financial translator (urgent assignments, technical terminology, special language). You can register for one webinar or for the entire series. Why? Because financial translation is not at all boring and could be a very profitable and rewarding specialisation. After more than 20 years translating, I would like to share what I have learned… and still learning.

Chasing money

Francesca Airaghi · Financial Translator

Getting started as a Financial translator

Take the first steps in a high paid specialty field!

financial translator

Go to course

Webinar: Getting started as a financial translator – Financial translation fundamentals

Financial translation is a type of technical translation which involves the conversion of documents, statements, reports, and web content from one language to another. Financial translation is performed by experts with lingistic expertise and a comprehensive grasp of the unique terminology used in this field of specialization. It is an added value and well remunerated job. So this webinar also aims to introduce you to the skills and techniques which you need to understand and translate financial and accounting documents.We will cover the key areas encountered by translators, proofreaders, financiers, economists and journalists and we’ll focus on some general accounting and financial topics that impact all companies, individuals and institutions, as well as specific topics of interest to financial translation.

So, welcome to this interesting and rewarding field of expertise!

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Doing business in China

在中国营商

Surprisingly, many of the visitors to this blog come from China, so  I’d like to tell them: 欢迎! For this reason, today I would like to devote this article to the Middle Kingdom, also known as the Asian giant (gigante asiático, in Spanish).

Emerging superpower

The People’s Republic of China receives continual coverage in the popular press of its emerging superpower status, and has been identified as a rising or emerging economic growth and military superpower by academics and other experts. In fact, the “rise of China” has been named the top news story of the 21st century by the Global Language Monitor, as measured by number of appearances in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet and blogosphere, and in Social Media. The term “Second Superpower” has also been applied by scholars to the possibility that the People’s Republic of China could emerge as a “second superpower,” with global power and influence on par with the United States. The potential for the two countries to form stronger relations to address global issues is sometimes referred to as the Group of Two.

Doing Business with China

Doing Business with China comprises a series of seven self-study modules that develop awareness and understanding of key elements of Chinese business culture, business structures, business traditions and business etiquette.

简体中

The modules are packed with hints, tips and practical strategies to enable you to build more productive commercial relationships in China, as well as work and communicate more effectively with Chinese business contacts.

Doing Business in China Online Course

Business in China

China Business 20/20 Insight, written in layman’s terms, addresses China’s complex business environment through a systematic approach. It provides the political, economic, legal, financial and business frameworks within which any meaningful China commercial adventure can be planned and operated.Stakeholders (corporate executives, expatriates, employees, and board members) will better appreciate the nature of the business undertaking by addressing such issues as:The linkages between politics and commerceThe unique brand of Chinese economic policiesThe immature yet evolving Chinese legal frameworkThe role of government in banking and corporate financeThe capabilities and constraints of electronic commerceThe different forms of business organizationsThe cultural framework of China business communicationsThe mindset and attitude of Chinese business executives–.and so forth.With knowledge of the China business environment, all stakeholders will be more cognizant of the rationale for the China strategy, resource allocation, corporate alignment, and vertical and horizontal coordination. This will result in more effective decision making, stronger employee buy-in, heightened investor empathy, more credible corporate governance and better corporate performance.

Joe Y. Eng is President of Eng Communications Associates. As a corporate trainer, coach and business consultant, he has over thirty years of experience with American Fortune 500 companies and Chinese corporations. A native speaker of Mandarin and Cantonese, he received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California at Berkeley. joe@usasiaexpert.com Tony G. Eng is Research Director at Eng Communications Associates. He has worked for Gateway Computers, Amplicon Financial and Netcel 360 in sales, marketing and business development. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of California at Los Angeles.

The 36 Strategies of the Chinese for Financial Traders 

trading China

Description

Ancient strategies provide a valuable link to enhance your ability to survive and prosper in modern financial markets. In this fascinating book, experienced trader and best-selling author Daryl Guppy explains how The 36 Strategies of the Chinese are applied to trading financial markets. In trading there is rarely a single answer to any trading situation. The best answer, and its effective application, depends on the trader. The strategies by themselves do not guarantee success. The trader’s skill in analyzing and assessing the situation determines how effective he is in selecting and applying the right strategy.

Guppy was introduced to the book of The 36 Strategies of the Chinese by a Chinese friend. An ancient and classic text, it is a compilation of political and military strategies dating back more than 1800 years, drawn from classic Chinese poetry, history, philosophy, biographies and novels.

This book includes specific methods for active investors and traders that are consistent with the meaning of the original ancient strategies. The 36 Strategies of the Chinese for Financial Traders follow the structure of the original36 Strategies of the Chinese. The first 18 strategies are applied when you have the advantage — the luxury of time and resources to examine techniques to recognize and maximize the return from these market opportunities. The second 18 strategies are applied when you are at a disadvantage — they are strategies used against investors and traders to inhibit success. Many of the strategies are enhanced using derivatives.

China commercial law

The Chinese Yuan: Internationalization and Financial Products in China (Wiley Finance Series)

Few topics have attracted as much attention worldwide in recent years as the RMB. These debates have gained added urgency in light of the financial crisis and the topic of RMB revaluation is now being actively debated in countries all over the world from Tunisia to the United States. This book explores the ever-changing role of the RMB and the related derivative products. However, it does so from a view that is heavily influenced by the fallout from the financial crisis as well as the in the context of the increasing maturity of the Chinese capital markets. The author has drawn on his experience as a regulator to provide invaluable views, insights and information on RMB derivative products and the development of this market going forward. Key topics include: Overview of current China economy and its capital market In-depth analysis on the China’s banking system and foreign exchange system Extensive analysis of on-shore and off-shore financial products in China Explanation of the needs and reasons for RMB products innovation Insights into the internationalization of the RMB Not only will this book leave its readers with a much clearer idea of the structure of China’s capital markets but it also gives insights on the market going forward leveraged through Peter Zhang’s many years of experience as both a senior banker and through his integral role in the key regulatory authority of the banking sector, the CBRC.

Dr. Guangping (Peter G.) Zhang served as manager and vice president in various financial institutions including Union Bank of Switzerland (UBS) New York Branch and Chemical Bank head office in New York in the area of over-the-counter derivatives. After working as Vice President for Chase Manhattan Bank in Tokyo, he further broadened his expertise at Harvard Law School. He jointed the Shanghai Futures Exchange in 2003 as Chief Financial Engineering Advisor and Senior Director of Research & Development Center, and the newly-established Supervisory Cooperation Department for Banking Innovation of China Banking Regulatory Commission (CBRC) in 2005 as Deputy Director General. He re-allocated to CRRC Shanghai Bureau as Deputy Director General in 2007. Dr. Zhang is an experienced financial expert with many articles and books published both in English and Chinese including Exotic Options – A Guide to 2 nd Generation Options (1998); Chinese Yuan (RMB) Derivatives Products (2004, English edition), Chinese Yuan Derivatives and Practices (2006, 1 st and 2008, 2 nd , Chinese eds.), and Chinese Yuan Product Innovation, (2010, Chinese ed.). Thomas Chan is an audit partner in KPMG financial services practice with more than 16 years of audit experience at KPMG China. He has comprehensive experience in auditing listed companies, accounting standard conversions and internal control compliance reviews. Thomas has extensive knowledge on operations of and regulatory requirements on commercial; banks, securities firms, trusts, asset management companies, leasing companies and private equity funds. He is a fellow member of both HKICPA and ACCA.

By Financial Translator

Traductor financiero / Traducción financiera

财务翻译

Traducción de normativa contable y financiera

Upcoming webinar: 17 de diciembre de 2014, a las 14:00 GMT

Ir a la página del webinar  /  Go to webinar

Traducción legal y financiera

Legal & Financial translation

Con los tiempos que corren, es imprescindible que la contabilidad y las finanzas se rijan por una serie de principios, normas y estándares.

En un mundo globalizado, dicha normativa se va homogeneizando. Tenemos un caso claro en las International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), es decir, las Normas Internacionales de Información Financiera (NIIF), que constituyen los Estándares Internacionales o normas internacionales en el desarrollo de la actividad contable.

En el próximo webinar de Proz, programado para el 17 de diciembre de 2014, a las 14:00 GMT, no sólo hablaremos de las NIIF, sinó que definiremos las normas, las leyes y los estándares contables; también veremos como la documentación contable y financiera refleja este marco normativo. Asimismo abordaremos las diferencias existentes entre las normativas contables y financieras, así como entre las instituciones que velan por su cumplimiento, en la Unión Europea, el Reino Unido y los Estados Unidos. Por supuesto, hablaremos de la legislación relativa al blanqueo de capitales, de los paraísos fiscales, de las auditorías y las due diligence. Veremos, finalmente, un ejemplo práctico de traducción relacionada con la normativa contable y financiera.

normativa contable y financiera

 

By financial translator

Traducción financiera

Gestión de activos y fondos de inversión Asset management and investment funds

Traducción Financiera: Gestión de activos y Fondos de Inversión

La traducción de gestión de activos es es una de las especializaciones mejor remuneradas de la traducción técnica, y los proyectos (desde prospectos de fondos de inversión a hojas técnicas, pasando por comunicados de prensa financiera y folletos de emisión…) suelen ser grandes y constantes.

La gestión de activos (asset management, en inglés) se refiere a la gestión de las inversiones de un cliente por parte de una empresa de servicios financieros, como puede ser un banco de inversión.

Un fondo de inversión (investment fund) es un patrimonio formado por varios partícipes, cuyas aportaciones administra una entidad gestora, que invierte los fondos siguiendo unos criterios previamente fijados.

Link:

La empresa gestora invertirá en nombre de sus clientes y les dará acceso a una amplia gama de ofertas de productos tradicionales y alternativos que, de otro modo, difícilmente serían para un inversor medio.

cropped-article-71342_640.jpg

En el próximo webinar definiremos la gestión de activos y analizaremos los diferentes fondos de inversión y los activos con los que operan. Veremos también como se definen sus términos y qué documentación (de obligada entrega por parte de la entidad comercializadora) generan. También veremos un ejemplo práctico de traducción de un prospecto de un fondo de inversión.




Como decíamos al principio, dentro de la traducción financiera, los documentos relacionados con la gestión de activos son los que gozan de unas mejores tarifas. Es cierto que implican un cierto grado de complejidad. Por este motivo, es imprescindible formarse en esta materia.

Además, la gestión de activos y los fondos de inversión, forman parte del temario del International Certificate in Financial English de Cambridge English; por lo que el webinar será de utilidad para preparar la parte teórica de dicho título.

traducción económica y financiera

Enlaces que te pueden interesar:




By financial translator

Traducción financiera

 

Interview with Francesca Airaghi, financial translator

It has been a pleasure to conduct an interview with Francesca Airaghi, a translator who has been working with financial companies, asset management companies, investment funds, banks, financial communication companies, law firms and international corporations for specialised translations.

  1. How and when did you get started as a financial translator?

In 1992, I graduated in Foreign Languages and started an apprenticeship at a translation company in Milan specialising in finance, corporate law and journalism. I attended a course in economics and finance, and after some months, I became in-house translator and proofreader, then Translation Manager. I specialised from direct experience and through constant learning over the years.

  1. Do you think financial translation is a good field of expertise?

First, it depends on your personal inclination. If you are willing to be constantly up-to-date with current affairs and you are able to cope with strict deadlines, the financial field may offer good opportunities. You can work with global companies and banks, solid asset management and investment companies, which have to translate a lot of financial material. However, this sector, like many other industries, may be volatile. It is a niche, though wide with many subgenres. I think it is up to you and your professionalism to succeed.

  1. From your point of view, what are the considerations a financial translator should take into account?

Finance is related to news, political, social and economic developments. In order to translate financial documents, you must understand the subject matter very well. Terminology is not enough. You must be constantly informed on global and national developments. Most importantly, you have to deal with time pressure. Capital markets do not wait. Translations are normally urgent, with a very quick turnaround (from a few hours to a couple of days for market commentaries or investment fund factsheets, a bit longer for quarterly or annual reports). Planning is challenging, you should be – or learn to become – a well-organised person.

  1. Some people consider finance is a rather tedious affair. What do you think about this?

In my opinion, each profession is at times boring, at times exciting. When I went to school, I wished to translate novels and romances. Over the years, I understood that finance and economics, as well as law and politics, are part of our everyday life. Translating news into Italian on the US “shutdown”, on the earthquake in Japan, or on the one-child policy in China is probably more interesting for me, and very much connected with real life.

  1. What has been your biggest professional challenge?

I have been translating from more than 20 years, so I could mention many projects that were particularly hard, for various reasons (deadlines, terminology, and relationship with the client). However, my biggest challenge was when I decided – after more than 10 years – to leave the (second) translation company where I was working in-house to become a freelancer. I knew I had the expertise and specialisation as translator and project manager as well, but not as an entrepreneur. I had to learn a lot, almost from scratch: marketing and accounting, and improving time management.

  1. Do you do anything to keep your translating skills sharp? Does it help to consume other media such as movies or documentaries in the language in which you’re working?

Yes, absolutely. I watch movies and videos in English. I read articles, blogs on freelancing and translation. Periodically, I also attend conferences and courses. I have found a lot of good on-line courses and webinars (including on Udemy, Proz, etc.), very useful and convenient because they are self-paced training. What I am missing a bit as a freelancer is the daily contact in person with international colleagues that is useful for feedback.

  1. You have been translating for some years. Has the market and the demand changed in the meantime?

Well, yes, from more than twenty years now. The translation market was and still is very fragmented, and it may be irregular and volatile. Globalisation and the Internet led to increased competition, even from unprofessional translators that work for very low rates. Translators’ visibility has improved in general, though not so much, at least in Italy. Probably, income diversification may help freelancers. However, most of my clients are still looking for quality and prefer a long-term relationship with the translator.

  1. Do you have a consistent strategy or technique that you employ in the mechanics of your translation routine?

I have developed a workflow both for the translation process and for my daily routine. As for translation, I start analysing the source text and client’s instructions, then look for specific terminology, translate a draft, revise, check interpretation, style, grammar, terminology, and then proofread again. It is a multiple-step process. As for my work routine in general, I try to avoid distractions. When I translate (usually in the morning), I focus on translation, then I organise my week to include training, reading, marketing, accounting, and a bit of yoga! I am using David Allen’s GTD method (Getting Things Done) to prioritise activities and focus on one task at a time. It makes me more productive.

  1. Are there any pitfalls to avoid in the translation business?

The biggest pitfall is to fossilize on one’s skills and not to learn continuously. Moreover, you have to manage “feast and famine”. And bad payers! There are very good translators who are bad entrepreneurs.

  1. What advice would you give to an up and coming translator?

I know it is not easy, however I would suggest to have an experience as in-house translator (even for free, if you can). It might be very useful to understand how this sector works. Mentoring might be a good solution for young translators, as well as spending time reading translation and freelance forums. When you start having success and clients, do not stop learning. Languages, specialisation, CAT tools, technical skills are of the essence, though do not forget “soft” skills, such as communication and teamwork.

Thanks again for sharing your expertise with us, Francesca. It is a pleasure to meet professional colleagues in the translation industry. I’m sure this interview will be of great interest to many visitors and translators.

www.francescaairaghi.it

www.francescaairaghi.it/blog/

Twitter @FranAiraghi

Gestión de Activos y Fondos de Inversión: la especialización mejor remunerada de la traducción financiera

By Financial Translator