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Business idioms

Business idioms and financial jargon illustrated

business idioms

An idiom is a phrase or a fixed expression that has a figurative, or sometimes literal, meaning whereas Jargon is a type of language that is used in a particular context —usually a specific trade or profession— and may not be well understood outside of it. Here you have a list of some of the most common idioms and jargon used in business. I’ve also included some sayings and terms that may come in handy in some business situations. This post will be regularly updated with new idioms and jargon.

busi

  1. A company man. Spanish: hombre de empresa. Business idiom.

2. Captain of industry. Spanish: jefe de la industria. Business idiom.

3. (to) cut one’s losses in Spanish: recortar gastos. Business idiom.

4. (to) go public. Spanish: Salir a bolsa. Financial jargon.

business idioms

5. (to) go belly up . Spanish: Irse a pique. Business idiom.

6. There’s no such thing as a free lunch. Spanish: No hay duros a cuatro pesetas.  Saying.

expresiones en inglés expressions in Spanish

7. Green shoots (the first signs of an improvement in an economy). Spanish: brotes verdes. Business idiom.

money idioms economy idioms modismos sobre economía y dinero

8. Chicken feed (a very small amount of money). Business idiom.

business idioms

9. Big fish in Spanish: pez gordo. Business idiom.

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10. Shark (e.g. loan shark). Shark in Spanish: tiburón (also in a figurative sense). Financial jargon.

business idioms

11. 800-pound gorilla. Business idiom.

economy and finance idioms

12. (to) foot the bill. (to) foot the bill in Spanish: pagar la factura (sometimes called “la dolorosa”). Business idiom.

13. (to) be broke (to have no money). (to) be broke in Spanish: estar sin blanca. Business idiom.

money idioms

14. Money doesn’t grow on trees / Money don’t grow on trees.  Saying.

Native speakers will often use the form “Money don’t grow on trees” in informal situations as it’s faster to prononce “don’t”, due to the fact it has one less syllable. In Spanish “El dinero no cae del cielo” (literally money doesn’t fall from the sky) conveys the same meaning.

money idioms

15. (to) be rolling in money / (to) be rolling in it. In Spanish, “estar forrado”. Business idiom.

money idioms

16. Money talks (you can do what you want with money). In Spanish one cas say “poderoso caballero es don dinero” (literally, Mr Money is a powerful gentleman) conveying the same meaning. Business idiom.

money idioms

17. Money doesn’t give happiness. In Spanish, “el dinero no da la felicidad”.  Saying.

business idioms

18. A rising tide lifts all boats.  Saying.

financial idioms

19. Time is money (e.g. In other words, in international trade, time is money). In spanish “el tiempo es oro” (literally time is gold).  Saying.

finance idioms

20. (to) call a loan. Financial jargon.

business idioms

21. Ill-gotten gains (e.g. These ill-gotten gains are laundered and go into circulation in the legal economy). Spanish: ganancias ilícitas. Business idiom.

financial jargon

22. Money laundering is the process of transforming the profits of crime and corruption into ostensibly ‘legitimate’ assets. (e.g.  The EU had also introduced measures to monitor and prevent money-laundering). Spanish: blanqueo de dinero. Financial jargon.

economy idioms

23. Money for jam (e.g. Selling cold drinks with a vending machine  is money for jam when it is very hot).· also money for old rope. Spanish: dinero fácil. Business idiom.

valer su peso en oro en inglés

24. (to) be worth its weight in gold (e.g. His ideas are worth its weight in gold). Spanish: valer su peso en oro.  Saying.

win win picture

25. It’s a win-win (Beneficial to each of the two parties). Spanish: ventajoso para todos. Business idiom.

financial jargon financial idioms

26. (to) skyrocket. Spanish: dispararse. Financial jargon.

financial idioms financial jargon

27. Margin call. Spanish: ajuste de márgenes. Financial jargon.

finance liquid assets

28. Liquid assets. Spanish: activos líquidos. Financial jargon.

business jargon business idioms

29. Cash cow. Cell phone accessories are a cash cow for our business. Spanish: vaca lechera, gallina de los huevos de oro… Business idiom.

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bull market stock market stock exchange

30. Bull market. Spanish: mercado alcista. Financial jargon.

financial jargon

31. Bear market. Spanish: mercado bajista. Financial jargon.

financial jargon

32. Venture capital. Spanish: Capital riesgo. Business idiom.

opa hostil en inglés

33. Hostile takeover. Spanish: compra hostil. (Hostile bid: OPA hostil). Financial jargon.

financial jargon idioms

34. Ninja loans. Financial jargon.

housing bubble property bubble

35. Real-estate bubble. Also: housing bubble or property bubble. Spanish: burbuja inmobiliaria. Financial jargon.

finance

36. Tax haven or tax shelter. Spanish: paraíso fiscal. Financial jargon.

friends and debts money

37. [Saying] A debt paid is a friend kept.  Saying.

38. [Saying] Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth French: Un tiens vaut mieux que deux tu l’auras.  Saying.

39. [Saying] A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.  Saying.

sayings dichos

40. All that glitters is not gold.  Saying.

A promise is a promise

41.  A promise is a promise.  Saying.

no pongas todos los huevos en la misma cesta

42. [Saying]  Don’t put all your eggs in the same basket

43. Square deal (A fair agreement). Spanish: trato justo. Business idiom.

business idioms

44. Nest egg. Spanish: fondo de reserva. Business idiom.

venta a corto

45. Short selling. Spanish: venta a corto, venta al descubierto. Financial jargon.

tipos de acciones

46. Blue chips           47. Growth stocks           48. Defensive stocks         49. Income stocks           50. Value stocks        Financial jargon.

business idioms

51. A penny saved is a penny earned.  Saying.

Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Depreciation, and Amortization (EBITDA)

52. EBITDA Financial and accounting jargon.

financial jargon

53. Credit rating. Spanish: calificación crediticia. Financial jargon.

financial jargon

54. Asset Management. Spanish: gestión de activos. Financial jargon.

apalancamiento

55. Leverage: In finance, leverage  is any technique involving the use of borrowed funds in the purchase of an asset, with the expectation that the after tax income from the asset and asset price appreciation will exceed the borrowing cost. Leveraging enables gains and losses to be multiplied. Spanish: apalancamiento. Financial jargon.

financial idioms

56. (to) keep one’s head above water. Spanish: mantenerse a flote. Business idiom.

economy idioms

57. On a shoestring > The documentary was made on a shoestring. Spanish: con recursos mínimos, con un bajo presupuesto. Business idiom.

busines idioms

58. Insider trading > The use of confidential information by an Associate for personal business and insider trading is strictly prohibited. Spanish: tráfico de información privilegiada. Financial jargon.

financial jargon

59. Chinese wall >  A set of rules and procedures – known as a Chinese wall – have been established to prevent inside information from reaching the areas responsible for the management of the ECB’s foreign reserves and own funds portfolio. Chinese wall in Spanish: muralla china. Business and financial jargon.

comercio justo

60. Fair trade. Spanish: comercio justo.

économie du bien commun

61. Economy for the common good

62. Comparative advantage. Spanish: ventaja comparativa.

ecomomics foreign trade

63. Absolute advantage. Spanish: ventaja absoluta.

business idioms

64. Monkey Business. Business idiom.

65. Banker’s hours. Business idiom.

financial jargon

66. Fixed and floating interests rates. Spanish: tipos de cambio fijos y variables.

flexibilización cuantitativa

67. Quantitative easing in Spanish: expansión cuantitativa

business idioms

68. Above board  > The negociations were long and at times quite difficult, but completely open and above board. Above board in Spanish: sin trampa ni cartón, trato justo. Business idiom.

Money idioms

69. Rags to riches. Money idiom.

business idioms

70. Golden handshake. Business idiom.

talk business

71. (to) talk shop. Business idiom.

72. Rome wasn’t built in a day. Saying.

idioms in Spanish

73. Out of the frying pan into the fire. (French: de Charybde en Scylla). Saying.

financial jargon

74. Market capitalization. Financial jargon.

economy idioms

75. (to) be sky-high. Business idiom. Spanish: estar por las nubes. Business idiom

finance

76. Wrapper. Financial Jargon.

saying

77. It’s good fishing in troubled waters. Saying.

contante y sonante en inglés

78. Hard cash (meaning coins or notes, but not cheques or  credit cards). Idiom.

arma de doble filo en inglés

79. Double-edged sword

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Business idioms Illustrated · Business proverbs · Business sayings memes · Business terms · Modismos sobre negocios · Proverbios sobre negocios · Dichos sobre negocios · Términos económico-financieros

Finance and Economics Memes

Finance and Economics Memes and jokes

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Finance quotes:

About the time we can make the ends meet, somebody moves the ends. Herbert Hoover

A budget tells us what we can’t afford, but it doesn’t keep us from buying it. William Feather

Memes for economists, financiers and accountants

Finance jokes:

A mathematician, an accountant and an economist apply for the same job.

The interviewer calls in the mathematician and asks “What do two plus two equal?” The mathematician replies “Four.” The interviewer asks “Four, exactly?” The mathematician looks at the interviewer incredulously and says “Yes, four, exactly.”

Then the interviewer calls in the accountant and asks the same question “What do two plus two equal?” The accountant says “On average, four – give or take ten percent, but on average, four.”

Then the interviewer calls in the economist and poses the same question “What do two plus two equal?” The economist gets up, locks the door, closes the shade, sits down next to the interviewer and says, “What do you want it to equal”?

 

Three econometricians went out hunting, and came across a large deer. The first econometrician fired, but missed, by a meter to the left. The second econometrician fired, but also missed, by a meter to the right. The third econometrician didn’t fire, but shouted in triumph, “We got it! We got it!”

 

A mathematician, a theoretical economist, and an econometrician are asked to find a black cat (who doesn’t really exist) in a closed room with the lights off. The mathematician gets crazy trying to find a black cat that doesn’t exist inside the darkened room and ends up in a psychiatric hospital. The theoretical economist is unable to catch the black cat that doesn’t exist inside the darkened room, but exits the room proudly proclaiming that he can construct a model to describe all his movements with extreme accuracy. The econometrician walks securely into the darkened room, spends one hour looking for the black cat that doesn’t exits and shouts from inside the room that he has caught it by the neck.”

Money is like manure. You have to spread it around or it smells. J. Paul Getty

The people who know personal finance hide the money very carefully. James Altucher

Memes and jokes about economy, finance and accountancy

Jokes:

SOCIALISM: You have two cows. The state takes one and gives it to someone else.
COMMUNISM: You have two cows. The State takes both of them and gives you the milk.
FASCISM: You have two cows. The State takes both of them and sells you the milk.
MILITARY DICTATORSHIP: You have two cows. The State takes both of them and shoots you.
BUREAUCRACY: You have two cows. The state takes both of them, accidentally kills one and spills the milk in the sewer.
CAPITALISM: You have two cows. You sell one and buy a bull.
PURE DEMOCRACY: You have two cows. Your neighbors decide who gets the milk.

REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY: You have two cows. Your neighbors pick someone to decide who gets the milk.

AMERICAN DEMOCRACY: The government promises to give you two cows if you vote for it. After the election, the president is impeached for speculating in cow futures. The press dubs the affair “Cowgate”.

ANARCHY: You have two cows. Either you sell the milk at a fair price or your neighbors kill you and take the cows.

Financial Translation: Online Course:




Engineers and scientists will never make as much money as business executives. Now a rigorous mathematical proof that explains why this is true:

Postulate 1: Knowledge is Power.
Postulate 2: Time is Money.

As every engineer knows,

Work
———- = Power
Time

Since Knowledge = Power, and Time =Money, we have

Work
——— = Knowledge
Money

Solving for Money, we get:

Work
———– = Money
Knowledge

Thus, as Knowledge approaches zero, Money approaches infinity regardless of the Work done.
Conclusion: The Less you Know, the more money you Make.

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Heard at the Wharton School.

Man walking along a road in the countryside comes across a shepherd and a huge flock of sheep. Tells the shepherd, “I will bet you $100 against one of your sheep that I can tell you the exact number in this flock.” The shepherd thinks it over; it’s a big flock so he takes the bet. “973,” says the man. The shepherd is astonished, because that is exactly right. Says “OK, I’m a man of my word, take an animal.” Man picks one up and begins to walk away.

“Wait,” cries the shepherd, “Let me have a chance to get even. Double or nothing that I can guess your exact occupation.” Man says sure. “You are an economist for a government think tank,” says the shepherd. “Amazing!” responds the man, “You are exactly right! But tell me, how did you deduce that?”

“Well,” says the shepherd, “put down my dog and I will tell you.”

 

Three guys decide to play a round of golf: a priest, a psychologist, and an economist.

They get behind a *very* slow two-some, who, despite a caddy, are taking all day to line up their shots and four-putting every green, and so on. By the 8th hole, the three men are complaining loudly about the slow play ahead and swearing a blue streak, and so on. The priest says, “Holy Mary, I pray that they should take some lessons before they play again.” The psychologist says, “I swear there are people that like to play golf slowly.” The economist says, “I really didn’t expect to spend this much time playing a round of golf.”

By the 9th hole, they have had it with slow play, so the psychologist goes to the caddy and demands that they be allowed to play through. The caddy says O.K., but then explains that the two golfers are blind, that both are retired firemen who lost their eyesight saving people in a fire, and that explains their slow play, and would they please not swear and complain so loud.

The priest is mortified; he says, “Here I am a man of the cloth and I’ve been swearing at the slow play of two blind men.” The psychologist is also mortified; he says, “Here I am a man trained to help others with their problems and I’ve been complaining about the slow play of two blind men.”

The economist ponders the situation-finally he goes back to the caddy and says, “Listen, the next time could they play at night.

A physicist, a chemist and an economist are stranded on an island, with nothing to eat. A can of soup washes ashore. The physicist says, “Lets smash the can open with a rock.” The chemist says, “Let’s build a fire and heat the can first.” The economist says, “Lets assume that we have a can-opener…”

Financial Advice Dog

All the economic systems explained with cows (click on the cow)

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Memes para Economistas, financieros y contables

 

Sources: memegenerator.com, guerrillastocktrading.com, quickmeme.com, andreafcecchin, 9gag.com, memecenter.com, quickmeme.com, memecrunch.com

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